Thursday, September 06, 2007

The Department of the Blindingly Obvious

A recent study by Southampton University shows evidence that behaviour is affected by certain food additives.

Now tell us something that we didn't know.

The vast majority of the behavioural problems currently blamed on a variety of fashionable complaints are down to nothing more than poor diet, weak parenting and lack of exercise.

Oh sorry, I've said that nine times before.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Chips for breakfast?
But how do you wean a generation raised on chips, Mcfatburgers and chips off of their thrice daily fix?

MV said...

Is this really a new finding? In 'Ayurveda', an ancient system of medicine in India (which is practised in many parts of the world even today), this fact has been stressed. For instance, 'rasayanas'(tonics) such as 'chyavanprash' can improve physical health as well as mental health. According to Ayurveda system, a person with good physical and mental health will be surely taking some type of 'rasayana'!

Anonymous said...

I will be delighted when this particular cause of behavioural problems is removed from the nation's diet.

Then teachers will be forced to face the truth about the pathological (by that I mean 'caused by disease or disability') behavioural problems rather than spout the same old bigoted rant about inadequate parenting.

It's the way that these things are lumped together with real disabilities and diseases by my lazy and ignorant staffroom colleagues that disgusts me.

You'd think a teacher would understand that sometimes special educational needs are better dealt with by adjusting their professional strategies than by sanctimonious ranting, but no.

It is necessary to rub their noses in the inconvenient truth that it is often the teacher who is inadequate, not the child or family.

Cynical

Stan Still said...

Blue Smarties are the devil's tool for causing outrageous behaviour.

They should be banned.

So should blue pop, or anything coloured blue.

Blue is not a natural colour for food, except perhaps for the mould in certain cheeses. Even those should be considered anti-social in certain circumstances.

Dinoplod said...

I reckon the proposed "lunchtime lock ins" will be beneficial to the kids long term but for supervision a nightmare. Additives are one problem,
abstinence is another.
Jamie for king - Hurrah!

Anonymous said...

mv said:
"For instance, 'rasayanas'(tonics) such as 'chyavanprash' can improve physical health as well as mental health."

Well, why not pop down to the local Indian takeaway for a plate of rasayanas topped with a chyavanprash sauce and some poppadoms, if it helps.

oh yes..Jamie for King and Queen Anne at his side (OK from a visual point of view not congruent but imagine what that pair could do!!!)

Anonymous said...

Hi Mr. Chalk, wondered if you'd seen this blog?http://theschoolboyfromhell.blogspot.com/

jerym said...

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2165455,00.html -----the above is not unconnected with this.You have to ask "What bloody planet do these people come from"?

Anonymous said...

You have said it several times before, but some things have to be repeated until somebody listens.

Anonymous said...

Sadly Mr. Chalk, the wingeing of a teacher does not qualify as what scientists like to call "evidence".

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