Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Today

The Today Programme emailed me (they don't know I'm nuts) because of a story in the news claiming that some schools are breaking the rules regarding admissions policy. These schools allegedly ask parents naughty questions about their marital status or financial background, and some apparently even ask for money. Read about it here

My own view is that any Head who doesn't do all of this and more is a complete fool. I've seen it done loads of times (but usually with more subtlety) and I'm sure you have too.

Anyway they would like to talk to anyone who has any experience of this and they assure me that all communication will be treated in the strictest confidence. (Make sure you get them to confirm this in writing and don't enter any naming competitions either)

If you want to tell them anything then email today@bbc.co.uk (Put ‘schools’ in the subject header).

5 comments:

Kimpatsu said...

Oh, come on, Frank. Admission by the religion of the child's parents just adds to segregation and devisiveness. Any head who does this is denying admission to the best on ability; he's fishing for select superstitions... when, in truth, superstition has no place in education, which is a secular enterprise.
If you disagree, go teach in the King Saud school in west London, where you can enjoy introducing the boys (no girls, obviously) to the joys of "Islamic maths" and "Koranic arithmetic"...

Anonymous said...

I wouldn't worry too much about kids in Catholic schools being indoctrinated. In the hall of our "Ofsted Outstanding" RC primary school (which has in the last month received an equally wonderful report on its RE provision from the Archdiocese) is a large display of the seven sacraments. The last of these is "Holy Orders". It is illustrated by a merry little group of Catholic Religious, including (even allowing for the artistic capabilities of lower KS2)a person who is unmistakably a NUN. For those of you who don't know (including our RC RE teachers) Holy Orders is a sacrament only available to the male of the species.......

athemax said...

not giving looked-after children the priority required by law
What's a looked-after child ?
I would have thought most children were looked after by someone usually their parents.
Or is the Govt saying it's OK to discriminate against neglected kids from broken homes?

Anonymous said...

looked after is jargon for being in care

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