Sunday, July 29, 2007

A Disgrace

This article alleges that teachers are helping pupils with their Coursework. This is both illegal and immoral.

I can honestly say that I never gave any pupil unfair help with their coursework unless their parents paid me a decent hourly rate to do so. Teachers doing it for free are completely undermining the integrity of the profession. I have no idea how widespread this problem is but would be interseted in your comments.

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's the same throughout life- the smartest people use the system to their advantage.

Mousie said...

But it improves performance figures and ensures targets are met.

Surely that's what matters?

Anonymous said...

If the school systems keeps producing that kind of pupils, the problem will take care of itself as the next generation of teachers won't be able to answer the tests at all.

Chuck Unsworth said...

Does this mean that pupils in your class would receive 'unfair help' but only if you received some sort of remuneration for your effort from their parent(s)?

If so, I agree. Teachers doing it for free are certainly undermining the integrity of the profession. It follows that those who charge the highest rates are the most upright members (advisedly).

Anonymous said...

There is nowt new here. I was once offered £500, back in the 1960's to find a substitute to sit the Cambridge English exam for a particularly thick princeling of the Saudi blood royal. The little love wanted to be a doctor.Needless to say I refused and sonny went back to Saudi without a licence to kill.

Anonymous said...

In my experience it is absolutely the norm that teachers not only help but almost write their pupils' coursework. I know pupils who couldn't read their MFL coursework, let alone write it. Same goes for Maths where children are given such heavy hints that they need to be blind and deaf not to write their coursework. EVERYTHING is laid out for them, the structure, the procedure, just everything. I don't think for one second that coursework reflects a pupils's standard of work. It reflects their teachers's standard of work. To be fair ,teachers are under immense pressure from SM and heads to present brilliant results (so the school looks nice in the league tables and the declining pupils are drawn there so the heads get higher salaries which are directly linked to the number of pupils..... )If not, they have to answer questions about their teaching (lovely pc questions such as "why hyas no learning taken place, were the pupils under-stimulated").... so what can they do if they ahve a group of absolutely dim-witted yr 11's who have to produce coursework in German and who can't even string together the most simplest of sentences?

Sandy said...

Here in the UAE plagiarism is so rife that 'Project Work' has become a joke. When we announce that there's a new project coming up, the students start falling over themselves in anticipation - of an easy ride.

It's the same with homework. I stopped giving homework to my college students some time ago, when I realised that the work I was getting back had either come via the internet or the student's 'Private Tutor' (i.e., one of the many brothers and sisters).

In some High Schools it's worse. The pupils come to school to meet their mates and socialise, as the opportunities for such idleness are limited due to the fiercely protective paternal nature of the typical Arab family. Little work gets done in class, so setting homework is common.

However, most students do in fact have a real Private Tutor, who does most of the work for them. In fact, as the pupils are not allowed out in the evenings, it's the best time for them to do a bit of studying - under the tutor's help, of course.

Strange, but true!

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